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Death of an Honest Man
2018
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When an insensitive newcomer to the village of Cnothan is found dead, Sergeant Hamish Macbeth confronts a bewildering array of suspects at the same time his clumsy police sidekick, Charlie, resigns in protest of his treatment by Chief Inspector Blair. - (Baker & Taylor)

When an insensitive newcomer to the village of Cnothan is found dead, flame-haired sergeant Hamish Macbeth confronts a bewildering array of suspects at the same time his clumsy police sidekick, Charlie, resigns in protest of his treatment by Chief Inspector Blair. By a New York Times best-selling author. 40,000 first printing. - (Baker & Taylor)

"Sergeant Hamish Macbeth--Scotland's most quick-witted but unambitious policeman--returns in M.C. Beaton's new mystery in her New York Times bestselling series. DEATH OF AN HONEST MAN Nobody loves an honest man, or that was what police sergeant Hamish Macbeth tried to tell newcomer Paul English. Paul had moved to a house in Cnothan, a sour village on Hamish's beat. He attended church in Lochdubh. He told the minister, Mr. Wellington, that his sermons were boring. He told tweedy Mrs. Wellington that shewas too fat and in these days of increasing obesity it was her duty to show a good example. Angela Brody was told her detective stories were pap for the masses and it was time she wrote literature instead. He accused Hamish of having dyed his fiery red hair. He told Jessie Currie--who repeated all the last words of her twin sister--that she needed psychiatric help. "I speak as I find," he bragged. Voices saying, "I could kill that man," could be heard from Lochdubh to Cnothan. And someone did. Now Hamish is faced with a bewildering array of suspects. And he's lost the services of his clumsy policeman, Charlie, who has resigned from the force after Chief Inspector Blair berated Charlie one too many times, and the policeman threw Blair into the loch. Can Hamish find the killer on his own?"-- - (Baker & Taylor)

Sergeant Hamish Macbeth--Scotland's most quick-witted but unambitious policeman--returns in M.C. Beaton's new mystery in her New York Times bestselling series.


DEATH OF AN HONEST MAN

Nobody loves an honest man, or that was what police sergeant Hamish Macbeth tried to tell newcomer Paul English. Paul had moved to a house in Cnothan, a sour village on Hamish's beat.

He attended church in Lochdubh. He told the minister, Mr. Wellington, that his sermons were boring. He told tweedy Mrs. Wellington that she was too fat and in these days of increasing obesity it was her duty to show a good example. Angela Brody was told her detective stories were pap for the masses and it was time she wrote literature instead. He accused Hamish of having dyed his fiery red hair. He told Jessie Currie--who repeated all the last words of her twin sister--that she needed psychiatric help.

"I speak as I find," he bragged. Voices saying, "I could kill that man," could be heard from Lochdubh to Cnothan.

And someone did.

Now Hamish is faced with a bewildering array of suspects. And he's lost the services of his clumsy policeman, Charlie, who has resigned from the force after Chief Inspector Blair berated Charlie one too many times, and the policeman threw Blair into the loch. Can Hamish find the killer on his own? - (Grand Central Pub)

Author Biography

M. C. Beaton has won international acclaim for her New York Times bestselling Hamish Macbeth mysteries. The BBC has aired 24 episodes based on the series. Beaton is also the author of the bestselling Agatha Raisin series, which is now a television show starring Ashley Jensen, available on Acorn and coming soon to PBS. She lives in the Cotswolds with her husband. For more information, you can visit MCBeaton.com. - (Grand Central Pub)

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Booklist Reviews

Longtime readers of the Hamish Macbeth series, set in a fictional village in the Scottish Highlands, don't keep coming back for the fresh plotting. The plot is nearly always the same: a stranger comes to the tiny fictional village of Lochdubh, speedily becomes wildly unpopular, and is murdered. The fun lies in the way Beaton depicts the different annoying, conniving, villainous victims. There's also the Highlands scenery to enjoy, along with a great deal of humor and the engaging series star, Sergeant Macbeth, who is unwillingly thrown into the murder investigations when he'd much rather be fishing or hiking. In this thirty-fourth installment, the stranger is a retired London banker who insults everyone he meets. And, of course, he's found in a peat bog, stabbed to death by a broadsword. Macbeth has a whole village of suspects on his hands, of course, but this time mystery deepens when Macbeth's detested, sadistic superior, Detective Chief Inspector Blair, turns up as one of the possible killers. Satisfying for both established and new Macbeth fans. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.

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