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Wars of the Roses : stormbird
2014
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After gentle Henry VI takes the throne and is promised a royal bride from France, the rival royal line, the House of York, begins their quest to oust him in the first book of a new series from the author of The Emperor series. - (Baker & Taylor)

After gentle Henry VI takes the throne and is promised a royal bride from France, the rival royal line, the House of York, begins their quest to oust him. - (Baker & Taylor)

“Capturing the violence and romance of medieval life, Iggulden makes real those grand characters who live in the collective memory. A page-turner sure to have readers eager for the next in the series.”
Kirkus


The first book in #1 New York Times–bestselling author Conn Iggulden’s brilliant new historical series about two families who plunged England into a devastating, decades-long civil war.

In 1437, the Lancaster king Henry VI ascends the throne of England after years of semi-peaceful regency. Named “The Lamb,” Henry is famed more for his gentle and pious nature than his father’s famous battlefield exploits; already, his dependence on his closest men has stirred whispers of weakness at court.

A secret truce negotiated with France to trade British territories for a royal bride—Margaret of Anjou—sparks revolts across English territory. The rival royal line, the House of York, sees the chaos brought on by Henry’s weakness and with it not only opportunity in the monarch, but also their patriotic duty in ousting an ineffectual king. As storm clouds gather over England, King Henry and his supporters find themselves besieged abroad and at home. Who or what can save the kingdom before it is too late? - (Penguin Putnam)

Author Biography

Conn Iggulden is one of the most successful authors of historical fiction writing today. His previous series, on Julius Caesar and on the Mongol Khans of Central Asia, describe the founding of two of the greatest empires in history. Iggulden lives in Hertfordshire with his wife and children. - (Penguin Putnam)

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Library Journal Reviews

Iggulden is a New York Times best-selling author of historical fiction, so pay attention to this first in a new series. In 1437, the Lancaster king Henry VI ascends the throne of England amid doubts that he'll be an effective leader because he's a pious milquetoast. Then a secret truce is negotiated with France to trade British territories for a royal bride, and in England all hell breaks loose.

[Page 70]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Library Journal Reviews

The start of another historical series for Iggulden features not a notable figure such as Ghengis Khan or Julius Caesar, but the array of kings and power brokers who afflicted 15th-century England. Henry VI, weak minded and weak willed, is manipulated into trading the English territories of Maine and Anjou for a French bride. The landowners there resist, as back home Richard of York maneuvers to be the power behind the throne. Protecting the unsuspecting king are his new wife, a few other lords of the realm, and Derihew Brewer, the king's spymaster. On top of this, a peasant revolt surges out of Kent toward London, threatening the monarchy itself. VERDICT Several of the well-drawn characters, especially the dashing, totally fictional Brewer, stand out to carry the narrative. The action swings back and forth between political intrigue and the brutal clashes of armies and mobs. And this is just the beginning. Fortunately for readers unfamiliar with the intricacies of this 50-year political melee, Iggulden's easy-to-follow take on the War of the Roses will keep followers of the old English royals completely engrossed. Bernard Cornwell fans will also enjoy. [See Prepub Alert, 2/15/14.]—W. Keith McCoy, Somerset Cty. Lib. Syst., Bridgewater, NJ

[Page 88]. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Library Journal Reviews

By the brutal winter of 1461, the medieval world is about to change, thanks to power struggles, lineage disputes, rights of ownership, vengeance, and sheer greed. Iggulden concludes his trilogy (Stormbird; Margaret of Anjou) about England's devastating Wars of the Roses with the same clear and often awe-inspiring regard for the people and the conditions prevalent at the time. Richard III is dead, and the victorious Margaret of Anjou claims the throne for the House of Lancaster. But Richard's heir and the new Duke of York, Edward, has other plans. Although Iggulden is ever attentive to authentic period detail (readers can almost smell the era), his narrative is never bogged down in the descriptions, delivering a well-paced, rich, and entertaining read. VERDICT Historical fiction buffs will love this trilogy, and historians will enjoy the many scholarly extras including maps, family trees, and list of characters. [See Prepub Alert, 2/1/16.]—Russell Miller, Prescott P.L., AZ

[Page 83]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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